Business

Six Steps to Educating Employees About Delegated Tasks and Assignments

Leaders teach employees how to perform their assignments and delegated tasks to ensure they are completed in a timely and accurate manner. An effective method of educating employees ensures a complete understanding of assignments and addresses productive ways to complete them successfully.

When tasks are delegated, many leaders are frustrated by the inability of employees to complete assignments in a timely and competent manner. Leaders often feel that completing tasks on their own is easier and faster. This becomes an excuse and a barrier to fully delegate. It also hampers the leader’s ability to grow and increase productivity.

Leaders understand that when they begin to delegate tasks and assignments, it takes time and patience to educate their employees to perform competently.

Leaders delegate assignments regularly, but continue to see employees fail to complete assignments and the expectations set for them. This is often the result of assignments or tasks that are misinterpreted, ignored, forgotten, or considered overwhelming. These negative results are generally attributed to inadequate or ineffective employee education.

Leaders know that to increase productivity and results, the first step is to properly educate their employees on how they want the task and assignment done and how to do it specifically. Employees must also know the deadlines set for getting the job done and the desired results the leader expects.

While employees may stumble initially, leaders understand that their competence will increase tremendously with time and experience.

Using the following six-step instructional method is a top priority for leaders because it eliminates the implementation and completion of failed assignments.

Review the assignment

To effectively educate employees, leaders start with a preview of the overall assignment, task, or responsibility. They look at all the necessary components to complete it effectively in a timely manner and review your personal expectations in this regard.

It is essential to develop notes and benchmarks to use when meeting with the people to whom you will be assigned.

Explain clearly and carefully

A primary responsibility in employee education is to make instructions as clear and precise as possible. Leaders know that explaining clearly is a two-fold process. They need to present their information in a logical way and free from confusion or ambiguity. The other side of clarity is how an employee perceives, interprets, and responds to instructions.

Leaders strive to use vocabulary that is at the employee’s level of understanding. Specific examples are used that relate directly to the tasks and expectations within the given task. Leaders carefully organize and sequence the components of each task that will be assigned to them. They remove irrelevant or unrelated information and are logical and realistic in their expectations and requirements.

Apply ‘Think Time’

It is vital to explain in detail the work to be done. Leaders should offer ideas or suggestions on how best to achieve this and create “think time” for employees to reflect and absorb what is being said. These are pauses inserted between the main discussion points and include several essential components related to the task or the employee’s questions regarding the task.

There is a time difference between listening and understanding. People speak much faster than you can actually hear. That’s why leaders strive to explain small portions of a general assignment within a given time frame, providing the necessary space for employees to think through the directions and various responsibilities that apply to all aspects of their assignment. . Additional time is allowed to ask questions and concerns so that employees feel fully prepared.

Assign reference materials and individual human resources

There may be times during the course of an assignment when an employee needs to use external resources. Leaders cover these contingencies in their instructions.

Employees should be given the names of two or more people who can help them in problem situations. Reference materials should also be provided with detailed explanations of how they can be used and for what kinds of situations. Discussions and illustrations on how and where to find solutions to problems related to their assignments should be included in the instructional process.

Repeat and redirect specific directions and points

Since full understanding is key to accomplishing tasks, leaders repeat and re-address detailed points, problems, and components of assignments on a consistent basis. This repetition focuses the employee’s attention on what is being said. Repeating and re-addressing issues also helps leaders avoid making last-minute changes to their assignments and / or instructions. It is also a good way to assess an employee’s levels of understanding. Leaders find that many employees are ready to begin their assignments immediately after a good period of instruction. Many will need little or no intervention and shoving afterward.

Self-assessment for understanding of the task

Leaders encourage employees to test themselves in areas of instruction that are not clear to them. The process includes being able to openly identify and express the main idea of ​​the various components, steps, actions, and responsibilities in your assignments. They should be able to remember the exact directives for each separate phase of their assignment. Employees must be able to verbally detail what to do, when it should be done, and how best to accomplish it.

Ideas, concepts, methods, or areas that remain unclear should be reviewed. Instructions should be re-given in the most appropriate learning style for full understanding. Leaders find that self-assessment works effectively at the end of an instructional period to review and solidify the various details and processes within given assignments.

Excerpt: Delegation: Precise Management Skills Development Training Series by Timothy Bednarz (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011).

Technology

Yacht charter in the British Virgin Islands

The British Virgin Islands (BVI) is a British Overseas Territory, located in the northern Caribbean Sea east of Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands. They are part of the Leeward Islands chain. The approximate coordinates are 18 ° 20 ‘N 64 ° 40’ W. The archipelago of the Virgin Islands archipelago is made up of the United States Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands.

The British Virgin Islands enjoy a subtropical climate, moderated by the trade winds. Temperatures remain fairly stable throughout the year with a daily maximum of around 29 ° C in summer and 25 ° C in winter. BVIs average about 115 cm of rain per year, although this is higher in the hills and the coast is drier. The rainiest months are from September to December. The British Virgin Islands is in an area that can see hurricanes from June to October and this effectively limits the boating season from November to May.

Among the many attractions of the British Virgin Islands are; numerous white sand beaches; the baths in Virgin Gorda, snorkeling in the coral reefs near Anegada; the famous bars of Jost Van Dyke Island.

The British Virgin Islands include the main islands of Anegada, Jost Van Dyke, Tortola, and Virgin Gorda along with more than fifty smaller islands and cays. The smaller islands include; Beef Island, Cooper Island, Ginger Island, Great Camanoe, Great Thatch, Guana Island, Mosquito Island, Necker Island, Norman Island, Peter Island, Salt Island. Only about fifteen of the islands are inhabited. The British Virgin Islands are mostly volcanic in origin and have rugged and mountainous terrain. Anegada is the exception and is a flat island made up of limestone and coral. Tortola is the largest island, approximately twelve miles long and three miles wide. Road Town, in Tortola, is the capital of the islands. The British Virgin Islands have a total population of around 22,000 people.

The Virgin Islands were first colonized by the Arawak Indians of South America around 100 BC. C. and they inhabited the islands until the XV century when the Carib Indians of the Lesser Antilles Islands displaced them. The first European sighting of the Virgin Islands was in 1493 by Christopher Columbus on his second voyage to the Americas. He called them Saint Ursula and the Eleven Thousand Virgins (Saint Ursula and her 11,000 virgins); this was reduced to Las Vírgenes (The Virgins).

In the early 16th century, the Spanish Empire acquired the Virgin Islands and developed copper mining on Virgin Gorda. Subsequently, the English, Dutch, French, Spanish, and Danish sought control of the Virgin Islands. They became a well-known pirate haven. During the process of European colonization, the native Amerindian population was practically annihilated.

In 1648, the Dutch established a permanent settlement on the island of Tortola. The British captured Tortola from the Dutch in 1672, and the British annexation of Anegada and Virgin Gorda followed in 1680.

The Virgin Islands were primarily considered a strategic possession, but were also planted when favorable economic conditions existed. The British introduced sugar cane which became the main crop and source of foreign trade. Slaves were brought in from Africa to work on the sugar cane plantations and the islands prospered until the growth of the sugar beet crop in Europe and the United States significantly reduced sugar cane production.

In 1917, the United States bought St. John, St. Thomas, and St. Croix from Denmark for $ 25 million, renaming them the United States Virgin Islands, and the British renamed the islands they controlled as the British Virgin Islands. The British Virgin Islands were administered as part of the Colony of the Leeward Islands or with Saint Kitts and Nevis, with an administrator representing the British Government in the Islands. The British Virgin Islands obtained separate colony status in 1960 and became autonomous in 1967.

Since then, the BVIs have moved away from an agricultural economy towards tourism and financial services and have become one of the richest areas in the Caribbean. Politically, tourism is the more important of the two, as it employs a large number of the local population and many of the businesses are locally owned. However, economically, the financial services sector is by far the most important, providing almost 50% of government revenue in the form of license fees for offshore companies.

Terrance B. Lettsome International Airport, also known as Beef Island Airport, has regular connections to San Juan, Puerto Rico and Saint Thomas, US Virgin Islands. There are also flights from most of the main Caribbean islands, Antigua and Saint Martin. It is located on Beef Island, just off the eastern tip of Tortola. Virgin Gorda and Anegada have smaller airports. The islands are a popular destination for Caribbean cruises and use the main port of the British Virgin Islands at Road Town on Tortola. The official currency of the British Virgin Islands is the US dollar. Major credit cards are accepted in larger establishments in the British Virgin Islands, but don’t expect to use them in small restaurants.

The traditional music of the British Virgin Islands is called mushrooms for the local cornmeal dish of the same name, often made with okra. The special sound of mushrooms is due to a unique local fusion between African and European music. Mushroom bands, also called “scratch bands and use a wide variety of instruments. Fingi is a festive dance form, but it also contains humorous social commentary and is a source for BVI oral history.

The British Virgin Islands are one of the most popular yacht charter destinations in the Caribbean and Tortola is home to the world’s largest charter fleet of yachts. Potential charters can choose between a skippered or bareboat charter. Motor or sailing boats. Monohulls or catamarans. Short distances between the islands, often just 2-3 hours, make the British Virgin Islands perfect for first-time yacht charters and families with young children. There are many flights to the BVI that facilitate access. On the downside, the British Virgin Islands can get crowded during peak periods; Christmas; Presidents’ Week and Easter. The first two weeks of July are also very busy due to the Puerto Rico vacation schedule. Charter yachts require a national park permit; ask your rental company for more details.

Moorings are becoming increasingly popular in the British Virgin Islands to prevent anchors from dragging on the bottom and damaging important coral reefs. Although cynics will tell you it’s about raising revenue too, and at $ 30 a night, it’s hard not to sympathize with this view. Night moorings are on 18 “white balls. Other mooring buoys will be found while sailing in the BVIs and are color coded as follows;

Orange: not diver, for day use only.

Yellow – Commercial dive boats only.

Large yellow: commercial vessels or vessels over 55 ‘in length

White: non-commercial boats, for day use only.

Blue: for boat use only

Also note that there is a 90 minute time limit on all moorings.

The main port of the British Virgin Islands is at Road Town on Tortola. And most letters start and end here. Village Cay Marina is one of the full service marinas available in Road Harbor offering fuel, water, ice, provisioning, laundry, showers, salon and spa. There is a freshwater swimming pool and a restaurant and bar facing the sea. Other marinas in Road Town Harbor include Fort Burt Marina and Inner Harbor Marina. There is also another full service marina on Nanny Cay that offers another starting point for yacht charters. The Nanny Cay Marine Center has amenities including showers, water, gift shop, laundry, ice and fuel, provisioning, storage lockers, and two restaurants. There is also a dive shop, mechanical repairs, refrigeration, welding, and a 24-hour boat chase service. Allow time at the beginning or end of your yacht charter to explore Tortola. Driving the steep and winding mountain roads of the island offers stunning views. Some of the best beaches in all of the British Virgin Islands are found at Cane Garden Bay and Long Bay, on the north coast of Tortolas. Tortola restaurants are highly regarded throughout the Caribbean. Shopping and nightlife tend to be low-key, but a selection of small clubs playing local music can be found in Road Town and at the beach bars around Tortola.

West End is shown on the charts as Soper’s Hole, a sheltered harbor that sits between Frenchman’s Cay and Tortola. The Soper’s Hole Wharf and Marina offers a full range of services located in charming colored houses. The Pusser’s Landing offers oceanfront dining at two restaurants and bars, an outdoor terrace and the company store.

Jost Van Dyke Island is named after a Dutch pirate. It has beautiful beaches, good food, and music. Jost Van Dyke is home to the famous “Full Moon” parties held at Foxy’s and Sidney’s Peace and Love Bar.

Anegada Island is known for its beautiful pink and sugary sand beach and for diving with ancient shipwrecks and coral reefs. Anegada’s Reef Hotel is famous for the local lobster. The dining room and bar are directly on the beach. If you disembark in Anegada, bring insect repellent. You have been warned !!!

Moorings are available and it is possible to anchor along the Virgin Gorda coast. Or you can get a mooring at the nearby Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbor, a marina with berth for 110 boats, where the ferry arrives for land travelers. The shops are concentrated around the Yacht Harbor area, especially in the Courtyard. Virgin Gorda Island is famous for The Baths, a full day of exploring caves and wells within this unique rock formation. Boats are no longer allowed on the shore here and you must swim from a mooring to the beach. The Bitter End Yacht Club is located on North Sound and is a great place to pick up a mooring. You will be among some of the beautiful yachts in the BVI here. The small desert island of Prickly Pear is a great place for lunch and snorkelling and is just a boat ride from the Bitter End Yacht Club. Spanish Town, on the southwest side of Virgin Gorda, is a popular stop for shopping and stocking up.

Norman Island or “Treasure Island” as the locals know it is the home of the pirate ship “William Thornton”. Legend suggests that this is the legendary Long John Silvers treasure site. Norman Island sits near the border line that separates the BVI from the US Virgin Islands.Although uninhabited, it is alive with tourism. The caves here are one of the most popular tourist attractions in the BVI. This is a popular overnight anchorage and many charterers will dine aboard the Willy T, a 100 ‘steel schooner.